• cat owner: hears noise from the next room over
  • cat owner: i don't know what you're doing, but i know that you should stop

Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

fuckyeahonepiece:

what-the-fuck-is-one-piece:

can we all take a moment to appreciate that this man is charging into battle with a fucking fish

why yes, yes we can

the-uncensored-she:

marfmellow:

fakespacegirl:

Hate doesn’t breed hate. Hate inspires anger in victims of hatred and that anger is called hatred to delegitimize it and villainize people. If you wanna help people who are victims then first you gotta stop acting like they’re just as bad their oppressors and abusers.

BUP BUP BUP

A message to white liberals and white feminists.

picklepup:

do you ever just

(Source: genderpup)

mosskitten:

I don’t want happy weddings I don’t want companies sticking little rainbows on stuff I don’t want allies flooding the streets at Pride for ‘support’

I want homes and clothes and hormones and medical care and education and legal protection and access to shared history and community and safety and respect for ALL my LGBT+ siblings. 

kiwikiwinomi:

Nami + blue outfits

@allusionaries replied to your photo “i was tagged by allusionaries for this bullshit Rules: Write your…”

aw u have such cute handwriting

i AM ADORABLE

zanabism:

being called “racist” isn’t an insult or something mean that people are saying to you because they want to bring you down. if you’re being called racist you shouldn’t be brushing it off because you “can’t see the haters” you should be assessing your behaviour, your language, and mindset for signs of prejudice, discrimination, and sympathy/support for unfair and violent treatment towards racially persecuted people in your country